DIY Build: Saddle Stand

Hi DIYers,
This project is geared for the Horse-Back Riders out there. Or for anyone looking to build a handmade gift for a horseback-rider: a DIY Wooden Saddle Stand, with storage to keep some saddle cleaning supplies and/or other small tack.

I’ll show you how I built mine, but it can be tailored to your specific needs. The height, width, side shape, and storage space height and dividers can all be adjusted.

 

Saddle Stand with Saddle

 

Sides of Saddle Stand

I started off with 1 piece of 1″x12″x48″ Pine Board, and cut it right in half. These are going to be the sides of my Saddle Stand. This board will give me an overall height of about 2′. If you need it to be taller, go ahead and start with a longer board.

 

Drawing Lines to Cut the Corners on the Sides of Saddle Stand

I wanted to use a 2″x3″ board down the center top (holding one side to the other). Since the 2″ side is 1.5″ Actual Size, I centered 1.5″ along the top and drew my angle lines from there with a square.

 

Cutting corners with miter saw

Cut my corners with the miter saw.

 

Cutting the Second Side

I used Clamps to clamp down the Side I cut onto the 2nd side. That way, I have the same corners on both pieces.

 

 

Clamping two Sides

Next I’m going to place and temporarily attach my 2″x3″ boards that run from one Side board to the other.
I clamped my two Side Boards together.

 

Marking the Screws for the Middle 2"x 3"

I marked my screw holes for my center 2″x3″ board that runs from one Side Board to the other.

 

Top Board Installed

I cut Qty. (3) 2″x3″s to be 22″ long. This length is just a few inches longer than my saddle. I used 8 x 1.5″ Cabinet Screws to attach my Center 2″x3″ Board that runs from one Side Board to the other.

 

Three Boards and Saddle

After I installed the center 2″x3″ board, I played around with the placement of the other two 2″x3″s that run from one Side board to the other. What I was looking for was that they weren’t raised too high, putting pressure points on my saddle. They are placed such that when the Saddle is sitting on the stands, most of the weight and pressure is in that middle 2″x3″ and the sides are just there for a little support. So, the placement is going to vary for yours. I attached the boards with (2) cabinet Screws on both sides.

 

Top 2"x3s without Saddle

Here’s the shot without the Saddle on it.

I unscrewed all the boards after this step to cut a shape out of my Side Boards. The next couple steps are optional or you could start creating the bottom storage space from here.

Template

I wanted the sides to have curves cut out. So, I drew and cut my template on a piece of cardboard, I found a straw hat and thought it had just the right oval-y shape I wanted.

 

I used the Jig Saw to cut my template shape out of my Side Boards. I Knew I wanted bottom storage space and the height was going to be 7.5″ (See next picture). SO, I aligned the BOTTOM of my template 7.5″ up from the bottom of my Side Board. Not Shown: This is the 2nd attempt. I made a mistake with drawing my template, so heed my warning. IF you are using a shape that is not Symmetrical, Make Sure that you flip it Correctly when marking the other half of the same board. Don’t Flip it Upside Down!! This is probably mostly obvious, but it was hard to tell on mine (it is ALMOST symmetrical but not quite). Anyway, so my cutouts were clearly not the same and I almost wanted to cry. But I made a second pass and smoothed out the jaggedy edges, and all is fine with the world. 🙂

 

I re-attached my top 2″x3″ boards and started cutting boards for my bottom storage space. I used a 1″x8″ Pine Board and cut the long sides to fit.

 

I cut to size a divider piece for my storage space. I played around with the placement a little bit. I have a bottle of oil I didn’t want to tip over so I decided to install the divider such that the bottle couldn’t fall.

 

Bottom of Saddle Stand

I cut a 1″x12″ board to fit across the bottom.

 

I drew my line along the bottom board 3/8″ from the edge and drilled two pilot holes.

 

Since this is the bottom, I’m using countersunk Screws, and a Countersink Bit so the screws sit there nicely.

 

I used Qty. 8 of these Screws for the bottom board.

 

Here, you can see the placement of all 8 Screws

 

oof, bad lighting. But you can see how to attach the Side Boards for the Storage and the storage divider. (2) Cabinet Screws for each board.

 

Pulled out the Corner Cat Sander for the 2″x3″ Boards. Sanding is possibly my least favorite part, however I feel like it’s one of the most important steps.

 

I didn’t sand off completely the random stamps like this one……Adds character right?

 

After each sanding, I use a tack cloth all over to remove all the dust.

 

I like to use Pre-Stain, especially on Pine wood. It is so soft and pourous that it doesn’t absorb the stain color evenly and often looks blotchy. It absorbs quickly so you don’t have much time to spread the stain around. The Pre-stain helps create a more even look.

 

One of my go-to colors for Staining- Minwax English Chestnut

 

Stained!

 

 

I did a light sanding before starting on the Poly.

 

I used Varathane Polyurethane and applied with a rag. I put on two coats, but you can put on as many as you feel you need to get the finish you want.

 

Almost there….Last thing I did was install some hardware.

 

So, I made another mistake when trying to drill holes for the handles. Totally misaligned. Maybe I’m not almost there…

 

I had to create a jig so I could center the hardware on the Side Boards and get the correct spacing! I used a piece of scrap and cut it to the same width as the Side Board.

 

Testing out the Jig…..It Fits!!

 

Use a square to level the jig and clamps to hold it in place.

 

It worked!! Now I have two holes to fill in……Good thing we embrace imperfections here at Jen’s Woodshop…sometimes it’s after a few tears first. So I grabbed some wood putty and filled them in later.

 

 

 

Stained Saddle Stand with Storage

 

Thanks for Reading!

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